Artist's Statement

My process has been inspired by my extensive training in school from life and nature as well as by studying the works of master painters. I have a great respect for master painters of the past, because they were innovative and creative in their painting techniques. With my own artistic process I try to find the basic geometric shapes of the painting as proportionately as possible. From there, I block in the shadow shapes, lay in color, and refine. Hue, value, chroma and drawing are all equally important elements. If you neglect one, the others will be aversely affected. For a painting to be successful it must remain a cohesive unit. Clarity of thought from inception to completion, for me, is a sign of a strong work, and is something that I am interested in maintaining in my own art.

I believe a painting or drawing is a still moment captured over time. It is the experience of observation recorded in color, tone, shape, and composition. When used together they can express the most complicated of subjects in the simplest way. When studying from nature and life one can train the eye to be perceptive and selective; thereby accomplishing a work that achieves a tactile reality, sense of dimension, depth, and an acute precision to drawing

Being able to separate the pre-conceptions of what one thinks he/she sees and what one is truly seeing is an extremely important idea as a painter and is something that is paramount to the search for truth in what I do. It is an abstract idea to think that one needs to try and not think about what that thing on the table is and try to just see it as an object. By deconstructing ones patterns of object recognition, stopping the naming of things and just seeing them as shapes lit by some kind of light source, we can begin to better understand the design and composition of a painting. In other words the act of painting is not the recreation of that subject, but rather the experience of studying the subject with ones eyes and creating a visual representation of that experience. It becomes a pattern of colors and shapes that can produce a profound emotional reaction from the viewer. When coupled with an idea, a purpose, or a type of metaphor, the meaning of the picture as a whole can become a sublime and compelling creation.